On Wednesday afternoon, the industry audience at the Glenn Gould Studio was treated to a live recording of TIFF’s in-house podcast, TIFF Long Take, in which hosts Rob Kraszewski and Geoff Macnaughton welcomed Actor, Comedian, and Filmmaker Louis C.K. to talk about the making of his film I Love You, Daddy, which premiered at the festival. Here are 6 things we learned from Louis C.K.

 ON HOW TO KEEP A SECRET IN 2017:

“You know, you just don’t tell anybody. [laughs] I mean, that really is it, because we didn’t really mean to keep it a secret, like, we didn’t have any mechanisms for secrecy. We just didn’t announce it and we didn’t brag about it. And all I did was ask the actors ‘just don’t talk about it…’ If they do it’s not a big deal. I figured it would get out, but the thing is there’s so much going on in entertainment, and there’s people shouting for attention. So if you just don’t say anything, nobody hears you…forever and ever and then you die.”

ON WHY IT WAS IMPORTANT FOR ‘I LOVE YOU, DADDY’ TO BE A MOVIE:

“Well, I guess I’ve done a lot of series TV, and there’s a rhythm to series television. The episodes that you do one after the other, and the seasons, turning into season, and there’s a cycle. And it puts you to sleep a little bit, y’know? And so, the idea of doing-and also I didn’t want to work with the network…I don’t know, it’s all in the writing really. Like, if I sat down and write down this story, and it was y’know 100 plus pages. So I just thought ‘let’s… let’s make it a movie.’ I mean, the fun thing about doing it on your own is that you don’t have to tell anybody that you even wrote it, you just write it, and maybe you never make it. I wrote this movie really thinking ‘I might not try to even make this movie.'”



ON WHY HE LIKES TO SURPRISE HIS PUBLICIST:

“He enjoys the ride, I think. I forget sometimes that I haven’t told him anything. So, like, 3 weeks ago I called him and said ‘so.. my movie got into TIFF’ and he said ‘you made a movie?’ [laughs] And I was like “yea yea yea I made a movie.’ ‘When did you make a movie?’ ‘A month ago.’ ‘What? Who’s in it? ‘John Malkovich’ ‘OH MY GOD!’ like, he thought that was the end of the list… ‘Edie Falco’ ‘JESUS CHRIST!’ So it’s fun and it’s also fun to tell him that I enjoy it, it’s fun. Surprise! I enjoy it.”

ON HOW I LOVE YOU, DADDY GOT INTO TIFF:

“I shot the movie in June, and I figured I would be editing for y’know, half a year or something…[After a few weeks,] I invited a couple friends over and watched it for the first time, the whole thing. And I was like “This is fucking pretty good…it’s not bad…” I always wanted to come [to Toronto] with a movie. I always wanted my first [self funded] feature that I wanted to take to a festival to be [in Toronto,] I tour in Toronto all the time… Because the audiences are always the best comedy audiences…I thought it’d be a great place to show a movie someday…So I found out TIFF [was done selecting films…] So I wrote [Cameron Bailey’s] an email and said “Hi, my name is Louis C.K., you don’t know me, but I made a movie. Here’s who’s in it. I made it in June. I would really like to show it at TIFF if it’s not too late.” And he called me and said ‘I don’t understand [laughs] who did you make this movie with? Like, who made it?’ I  said ‘I just did it.’ He said ‘After I got your email, we did a search for the movie,’ because they know of every production on the planet. And he says ‘we can’t find you.’ And I said ‘I just made it with my own money.’ And I told him that we shot it on film, and he was like ‘YOU SHOT IT ON FILM? BLACK AND WHITE FILM?’ I was like ‘Do you have any room?” and he said ‘No. but send me the movie’ …he found a space for us, I mean, we shouldn’t be here. It’s not fair. [laughs] It’s totally unfair to real filmmakers.”

ON INFLUENCES FOR I LOVE YOU, DADDY:

“Lots of different filmmakers. I love old 40’s black and white films, I like [pre-Hayes code] films. Most of the movies I was watching while writing I Love You, Daddy, and putting it together were pre-code films. There was one called Dinner at Eight, which I recommend everybody to see. It’s just a really harsh play about people losing it during the depression, but it’s super funny. And nobody’s good or bad in that movie, it’s [just] everybody’s both. There’s a movie called Baby Face… which is just a brutal* movie. She plays this girl, her dad makes her wait tables in his bar…he also pimps her to local men. And so, she burns the place down…so she goes to New York City and fucks her way up the corporation ladder, and claims it as like ‘this is my right.’ I mean, it’s really intense, and they don’t mince any bones about what’s happening.”

ON WHO MAKES HIM LAUGH THE MOST:

“Geez. Pamela Adlon makes me laugh. Zach Galifianakis always has my number…It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia…Family Guy…Rick and Morty makes me laugh a lot… Marc Maron just made a stand up special that was really good, he’s my friend so I was happy for him.”

You can catch the entire Podcast recording below and on TIFF’s YouTube channel.

 



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